GitHub is home to over 40 million developers working together to host and review code, manage projects, and build software together.

Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community. Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account. I am trying to apply a global and a local interceptor to a NestJS application. The global interceptor is used for tracing every call in the application, logging incoming requests and outgoing responses. The local interceptor is used for caching some responses. From comment :. Thanks for reporting RecuencoJones!

I just updated to the latest version and any controller with UseInterceptors doesn't execute anymore. I tested with demo interceptors from documentation and get the same behavior. Connection hangs and eventually times out. Everything fails. Renders it unusable. The only output is Before I did a simple proof and somehow got to fix it by changing the code in interceptors-consumer. This might not be the best approach, I couldn't spend much time understanding the codebase and didn't consider typechecks nor tests.

Also, I guess it will be a problem to change the signature of intercept since it will be quite a breaking change. I understand, thanks kamilmysliwiecdo you have a rough estimation for this to be released? Also, is your fix checked in somewhere?GitHub is home to over 40 million developers working together to host and review code, manage projects, and build software together.

Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community. Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account. I am attempting to use an Interceptor to modify the incoming request particularly request.

However, it appears that RouteParamsFactory. I considered a pipe, but pipes do not have sufficient context about the request for me to make my modifications. I considered using a middleware, but those are executed prior to the router so route params are not available yet. I would like the ability to use interceptors to rewrite the incoming request before values are extracted from the request.

It is sort of possible, as you can modify the request object, and code that uses that reference later will have the modifications. But I think it would be good to have consistent values from the request object regardless of the mechanism of access. I think it would also be helpful to have a page in the docs that details the order of execution amongst middleware, request parsing pipes, guards, interceptors, filters.

There are hints on the various pages and but I think interceptors documentation is missing. For example, how should I populate request. Middleware, the guard itself, or an interceptor? I think the interceptor runs too late from testing, so I implemented in middleware. Hi tma-isbxIt should be fixed in 4. Could you let me know? In version 5. However, it is still available via the context object:.

This thread has been automatically locked since there has not been any recent activity after it was closed. Please open a new issue for related bugs. Skip to content. Dismiss Join GitHub today GitHub is home to over 40 million developers working together to host and review code, manage projects, and build software together.

Sign up. New issue. Jump to bottom. Copy link Quote reply. I'm submitting a Current behavior I am attempting to use an Interceptor to modify the incoming request particularly request. Expected behavior I would like the ability to use interceptors to rewrite the incoming request before values are extracted from the request. This comment has been minimized.

Sign in to view. Looks like it is working for me now, thanks!GitHub is home to over 40 million developers working together to host and review code, manage projects, and build software together. Have a question about this project? Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community. Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account. The local Interceptor class based or method based executes but then the actual controller function doesn't get executed.

I found that await handler packet. But this Observable is not being awaited on. Also no global Interceptors work for Microservice Patterns in a hybrid app. Is this intentional? If yes, why? Although events don't have a return value I want to be able to use Interceptors for EventPatterns. This thread has been automatically locked since there has not been any recent activity after it was closed.

Please open a new issue for related bugs. Skip to content. Dismiss Join GitHub today GitHub is home to over 40 million developers working together to host and review code, manage projects, and build software together. Sign up. New issue. Jump to bottom. Copy link Quote reply. I'm submitting a Expected behavior Global and local Interceptors should work for Microservice Events. Remove interceptor from AppMsController.

Ideas App - NestJS API 01 Introduction

Event: Hello World! Although events don't have a return value I want to be able to use Interceptors for EventPatterns Environment Nest version: 6. This commit was signed with a verified signature. This comment has been minimized. Sign in to view. Fixed in 6. Sign up for free to subscribe to this conversation on GitHub. Already have an account? Sign in. Linked pull requests.

You signed in with another tab or window. Reload to refresh your session.February 17, 6 min read When we deal with objects in our applications, they often contain sensitive information.

An object that represents a user fetched from the database, for example, would likely contain a password. Other times, a lot of information saved in an object is not useful for the end client and should be removed before sending the object over the network to save bandwidth.

The process that takes care of both of these is called serialization. Serialization is a process of preparing an object to be sent over the network to the end client.

To prepare an object could be to exclude some of its sensitive or unnecessary properties or to add some additional ones. NestJS provides a way to serialize objects returned from our API endpoints with the use of a little decorator magic and a library called class-transformer.

The solution is good for very basic cases, but falls short in more complicated ones. For example, to serialize an object, we have to return the object itself. While it may not seem like a problem, consider the following:. As expected, the object returned by the findOne method will be serialized.

Now, what if we wanted to create a findAll method that returns many user objects? Usually such endpoints return more than just the entities — say, pagination info.

nestjs logging interceptor

It is clearly stated in the documentation:. Note: we must return an instance of the class. And thus, the pseudo-code above illustrates the lack of flexibility that the out-of-the-box serialization provides. Thankfully, creating a reusable serialization solution with the use of the Nest ecosystem is a breeze.

Second, as in the example above, we have to create our own interceptor that will take care of actually running our serializers. Then, the interceptor goes over the keys of the returned object and serializes the values that were marked. This way, from inside the interceptor, we can easily check whether a value of the property is an instance of the Serializable class. The function will be provided by the serializer.

We are going to create an abstract class called BaseSerializerService that will provide all the reusable methods for all the serializers. The class takes two generic types, E and Twhich stand for an entity and a serialized value, respectively.

Each serializer will implement its own serialize method; thus, the method is abstract and has no implementation.

Hello, nest!

The serialize method takes an entity and a user role. Then, taking into account the user role, it serializes the entity. Afterwards, the serialized object is ready to be sent to the end client. The second method is called serializeCollectionwhich takes an array of entities and returns an array of serialized objects. Admittedly, we could have used a single method called serialize and checked ourselves whether the provided value is an array, but it is better to keep the API as unambiguous as possible.

In order to mark the returned value as serializable so the interceptor could serialize it later, we provide two methods:. Both functions accept one parameter: in the first case, it is an entity, and in the second, a collection of entities. With the serializers methods in place, we simply pass them to the Serializable class so they can be called later by the interceptor.

Interceptors in Nest are called before and after a request is handled, providing us with the opportunity to transform the object returned from a controller method. The public method intercept is required by Nest, and it is called before each request.

It has two parameters: context and next. Thanks to the context object, we can easily get access to the underlying http request. We are going to assume that there are some guards or middleware that set the authenticated user object in request. Having access to the user object, we can easily get the role of the authenticated user.GitHub is home to over 40 million developers working together to host and review code, manage projects, and build software together. Have a question about this project?

Sign up for a free GitHub account to open an issue and contact its maintainers and the community. Already on GitHub? Sign in to your account. To add to this, I can confirm that if I use the UseInterceptor decorator on a controller, everything works fine.

It is only when the interceptor is mounted globally. I'm still seeing this tagged with the question label, I think it should be either categorized as a bug or at the very least a feature request. Yes it would be good to know if it can be implemented or not. I am trying to log errors with a request unique id. I tried to find out this problem.

But currently cannot be overcome. I had to remove scope. I also can't verify that this works. When I either set scope: Scope. REQUEST in my provider or I implicitly cause it by passing a request-scoped dependency, it appears that my useGlobalInterceptors call is ignored --the body of my interceptor factory method is never actually evaluated at any point. I can't spare the time right now to build a minimal example, but I'd be very interested in seeing the disproof of this.

Is there an example of request-scoped interceptors working with useGlobalInterceptors? If I attempt to app. The kicker? Its constructor is never invoked. If you throw an exception in its constructor, that exception never fires. It just creates the class without ever actually injecting anything into it.

I get why this happens, but this should just throw an exception, shouldn't it? It gets weirder, though, and this is the interesting state of the request-scope-test repo linked above. If you use a FactoryProvider with scope: Scope. This behavior is better than the above behavior This should probably throw an exception, too.

My guess is that this latter behavior is actually fairly related towhere kamilmysliwiec requested a test repo; intuitively I wonder if fixing this would also fix that. It seems like the end solution here is that app.

Further investigation today suggests that request-scoped global interceptors don't and can't work.

nestjs logging interceptor

The profusion of Consumer and Context classes is making it hard for me to be sure. Who can help me help myself? You obviously cannot use app. Only this syntax:.

nestjs logging interceptor

If you want to bind global enhancers that should live within Nest DI scope, you should use syntax that I shared above. You should never combine these methods with. Regarding get support for both request and transient-scoped providers, we track this issue here and there is a PR with a solution already. I would take some issue with the use of the word "obviously".

It's not obvious to me, as a user, why useGlobalInterceptors can't take an InjectorDefinition and just do the right thing.Nest NestJS is a framework for building efficient, scalable Node.

Nest provides a level of abstraction above these common Node. This allows developers the freedom to use the myriad of third-party modules which are available for the underlying platform. In recent years, thanks to Node. This has given rise to awesome projects like AngularReact and Vuewhich improve developer productivity and enable the creation of fast, testable, and extensible frontend applications.

However, while plenty of superb libraries, helpers, and tools exist for Node and server-side JavaScriptnone of them effectively solve the main problem of - Architecture. Nest provides an out-of-the-box application architecture which allows developers and teams to create highly testable, scalable, loosely coupled, and easily maintainable applications. The architecture is heavily inspired by Angular.

To get started, you can either scaffold the project with the Nest CLIor clone a starter project both will produce the same outcome. To scaffold the project with the Nest CLI, run the following commands. This will create a new project directory, and populate the directory with the initial core Nest files and supporting modules, creating a conventional base structure for your project.

Creating a new project with the Nest CLI is recommended for first-time users. We'll continue with this approach in First Steps. To install the JavaScript flavor of the starter project, use javascript-starter. You can also manually create a new project from scratch by installing the core and supporting files with npm or yarn. In this case, of course, you'll be responsible for creating the project boilerplate files yourself.

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nestjs logging interceptor

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